PROXIMATE ANALYSIS ON LEAVES OF CASSAVA PLANT OBTAINED FROM A ROAD SIDE FARM

abstract

The inappropriate cultivation of edible plants along roadsides is generally disregarded in developing nations. Particulate matter and heavy metals are toxic chemicals produced by automobiles that harm plants, which in turn affects people and other animals. Popular shrub Manihot esculenta is primarily found growing along roadsides. The protein, fiber, lipid, and moisture contents of the leaves of Manihot esculenta decreased when compared to control samples, which had protein, fiber, ash, and moisture contents of 5.075%, 4.540%, 1.769%, and 67.997%, respectively. However, the ash content of the leaves of the plant highly exposed to automobile pollution increased, with a percentage content of 9.767% when compared to control with a content of 6.418%. Plant growth should therefore be limited near roads.

 

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