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SECONDARY SCHOOL INDISCIPLINE SURVEY AND TYPES OF INDISCIPLINE

SECONDARY SCHOOL INDISCIPLINE SURVEY AND TYPES OF INDISCIPLINE

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

1.1   BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY

Children are often referred to as a country’s wealth and pride. Thus, the future of any nation is dependent on its youth, who represent the potential human resources needed for the society’s survival. As a result, in order for a community to thrive indefinitely, young people must be saved as well as disciplined (Rafael, 2007). School indiscipline has long been a source of concern for educators, policymakers, and the general public, as a result of peer aggression, violence within the teacher-student relationship, and vandalism, all of which contribute to the problem of student dropout, deviant behavior, examination malpractice, lateness, and poor academic performance. Indiscipline is a multidimensional phenomenon in terms of manifestations and causes in the social, psychological, and educational sectors. as well as its meanings and functions. Amado and Freire (2009) believed that the most serious circumstances are framed in what they call the first level of indiscipline, which they define as disruptive episodes that interrupt classroom functioning. Disagreements among classmates and conflicts within the teacher-student relationship, which can escalate to aggression and even delinquency, are examples of second and third level occurrences. According to Yaroson (2004), indiscipline is a problem that pervades all aspects of man’s existence and has brought him to his knees. School discipline, according to Gaustard (2005), has two primary goals. The first is to ensure the safety of both staff and children, and the second is to create a learning environment. as well as its meanings and functions. Amado and Freire (2009) believed that the most serious circumstances are framed in what they call the first level of indiscipline, which they define as disruptive episodes that interrupt classroom functioning. Disagreements among classmates and conflicts within the teacher-student relationship, which can escalate to aggression and even delinquency, are examples of second and third level occurrences. According to Yaroson (2004), indiscipline is a problem that pervades all aspects of man’s existence and has brought him to his knees. School discipline, according to Gaustard (2005), has two primary goals. The first is to ensure the safety of both staff and children, and the second is to create a learning environment.  According to Soet (2005), citing Charles, the top of their concerns (1981). Teachers prioritize discipline over all other factors in determining a teacher’s success because it affects learning and their emotional lives. Jeng (2011) instructs students to recognize that one of the most fundamental characteristics of a human being in school, at home, and around the world is discipline. Stakeholders agree that maintaining school discipline is a top priority because character cannot be acquired without knowledge. In his study, “Perception of the Causes of Indiscipline among Students in Mt. Elgon District,” Soet (2005) believes that schools require discipline. It is the one aspect of education that everyone looks forward to and desires. Most educators believe that discipline is the only factor that can help. Make or break a school, because without it, even the best efforts of a teacher may be in vain. Discipline is viewed differently by different people. Some people associate discipline with taking precautions. According to Okumbe (1998), this style attempts to take preventative measures and may take the form of guidance or explaining values and regulations to students. Padilla (2012), a seasoned speaker who leads parent workshops for California school districts, agrees that it is a positive method that promotes and rewards good behavior rather than penalizing bad behavior. Others, as Mbiti (2007) points out, see discipline as a form of punishment, with traditionalists believing that physical punishment was a necessary deterrent to a child’s wrongdoing.  tendencies. Wilson (2000) holds the same opinion. He emphasizes that, while it is an unpleasant line to walk, any parent who wants to prevent their son from bullying their younger sister, or any honest teacher who wants to ensure that the weaker students in school are not bullied, understands that it must be crossed from time to time. Many teachers used physical punishment to maintain order in their classrooms in the past. This is codified in the Education Act Cap 211 (1980), which states that punishment can only be administered in cases of persistent or serious work neglect, lying, bullying, excessive insubordination, indecency, or truancy, among other things. The Education Act of 1980 specified how and by whom Who would be punished? However, the then-Minister of Education issued Legal Notice No. 56/2001 in 2001, making physical punishment unlawful (Mbiti, 2007). Since then, there have been numerous debates in Kenyan schools about whether the cane should be prohibited. Indiscipline is the willful violation of a society’s laws and regulations. It is deeply embedded not only in Kenyan schools, but also regionally and globally. The task force on student discipline and unrest in secondary schools (Wangai report, 2001) discovered that student discontent has increased in educational institutions. For a long time, learner indiscipline has dominated global and regional discussions. According to Khanbab (2010), India’s schools and colleges have devolved into a shambles. It has become a haven for indiscipline to the point where tests must be administered with the assistance of the police. He blames it all on students’ poor study habits, inept professors, and political leaders who encourage them to rebel against the government. According to a recent study in the United States, bullying is a common and potentially harmful type of violence among children, which not only harms the intended victims and offenders, but also chills the school environment, affecting all students’ ability to learn to the best of their abilities (Limber and Nation, 1997). Danso (2010) criticized Ghana’s educational institutions for having high rates of indiscipline and anarchy. He observed that hardly a single day goes by without a report of a youngster committing an act of indiscipline in school.

either a primary or secondary school. He bemoaned the causes of drug abuse, rape, armed robbery, abortion, and even murder in educational institutions. Meaningful teaching and learning aimed at achieving school goals will be impossible to achieve if instructors and students are not disciplined. According to Aguba (2009), discipline is required to raise a generation of well-educated children who respect themselves and others in school and society.

1.2 THE PROBLEM’S STATEMENT

Student indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools has been discovered to be a cankerworm that has eaten too deeply into the kids’ morale. Students have become uncontrollable and disobedient to themselves, their teachers, the school administration, their parents, and society as a whole (Denis, 2003). Among  Boycotting classes, watching and practicing pornography, lying, violence, dishonesty, disobedience to teachers, prefects, and school administration, raping school/classmates, alcohol consumption, confronting and stabbing teachers in schools, vandalism, lateness to school, cultism, drug abuse, insulting/assaulting, stealing, and rioting are among the acts depicted by students. The extent to which students’ indiscipline in school is correlated with peer group perspectives, their parents’ socioeconomic achievements, parent’s attitude, teacher’ attitude, school culture, climate, and environment; and the magnitude of disorder it causes in school, as well as what strategies should be implemented to curb this deviant behavior, are unknown (Danso, 2010). Students’ indiscipline is influenced by student-student connections (peer group) as a result of an uneasy and unsustainable environment in which students’ demands are difficult to address and school is difficult to address.

Curriculum is regarded as meaningless. The researcher was motivated by a desire to learn more about the main causes and contributors of student indiscipline in Cameroon secondary schools, as well as the hope of finding long-term solutions.

1.3 THE STUDY’S OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of this school is to investigate the most common types of indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools, as well as the causes and potential solutions. The research is guided by three specific goals:

i. Identify the most prevalent and consistent types of indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools.

ii. To investigate the causes of indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools.

iii. Investigate potential solutions to the problem of school indiscipline.

1.4 QUESTIONS FOR RESEARCH

i. What are the most common

What are the most common and consistent types of indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools?

ii. What are the causes of indiscipline in Nigerian secondary schools?

iii. What viable solutions are there to the problem of school indiscipline?

1.5 THE STUDY’S IMPORTANCE

The findings of this study will contribute to the existing body of knowledge about the specific causes of indiscipline among secondary school students in the United States. It also revealed the type of disobedience that would emerge as a result of these causes. The research is critical in terms of providing good approaches to discipline improvement. Teachers frequently punished children without considering what caused them to transgress; they rarely attempted to understand the underlying cause. By concentrating on these aspects, they

will be able to comprehend and interact with their students more effectively. It may also assist parents in keeping track of their children’s movements and associations so that they can guide them toward becoming responsible adults. They are in a better position to ensure the proper upbringing of their children. The Ministry of Education may also see the value in bolstering these new initiatives, which are currently lacking in the majority of schools. They may use the findings of the study to address similar issues at other schools across the country.

1.6 STUDY OBJECTIVES

This study survey on the types of indiscipline in secondary school includes students from Government Secondary School in Idah, Kogi state.

1.7 THE STUDY’S LIMITATION

The most significant challenge encountered during this research is time.

The researcher has limited time to complete the research and insufficient funds to support the project and visit more than one school.

1.8 TERMS AND CONDITIONS

A survey is a term that refers to a thorough examination of anything (someone or something).

Indiscipline is defined as a lack of discipline.

Discipline is the process of teaching people to follow rules or a behavioral code and then punishing them when they do not.

Secondary school serves as a bridge between elementary school and college.

 

 

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